Events in the Gallery at Bankley Studios Manchester

Upcoming Events at Bankley Gallery

A Show About The Show

PV: Friday 25th August 2017, 7-9pm
Exhibition continues: Saturday 26th August, 11-4pm

An exhibition about the nature of exhibitions, Scaffold Gallery's next show will focus on the culture, history and etiquette of art-shows and 'private-views'.

Twenty-two artists present new works in response to their experiences of exhibitions, reacting to their role in society, how they function and the customs and behaviours of an opening night. Through a wide variety of methods - including sound installation, photography, sculpture, performance, publications, video work and more - the artists each provide comment and critique on the rituals and traditions of the art exhibition.

Richard Hughes, Rado Daskolav, Kayt Hughes, Devon Forrester Jones, Sid & Jim, Meg Brain, Kieran Leach, Will Marshall, Adam Ralph, Laura Weaver, Laura Hopkinson, Carrie Doughty, Claire Prosser, Emily Simpson, Carritt & Palmer, Rob Flint, Lewdjaw, Rowan Eastwood, Bob Bicknell-Knight, John Flindt, Rose Cleary, Deaf Pictures, Daniel Hunt.

www.scaffoldgallery.com

Previous Events at Bankley Gallery

Escape to the Country

Private View: 4th August 2017, 7-9pm
Exhibition continues until the 13th August 2017
open by appointment.

Escape to the Country is Evie O’Connor’s first solo show, conceived when she made the decision to move back to her hometown of Glossop in the High Peaks of Derbyshire. Being back in a familiar space rooted in her adolescence, whilst simultaneously living within a new narrative, has informed this new series of works, that are derived from direct experiences of the specific landscape and her interpretation of familiarity.

The past year has seen her exoticize and abstract her environment. Themes of isolation, class, self-examination and identity are explored within her body of work. The sense of isolation which is both trapping and liberating is heavily romanticised, with her reclusive nature prompting this reoccurring act of examination and translations of others close to her. Favouring people as the main subject of her work, the lone figures help direct her and create new versions of those close figures in her life into the surroundings. Her portraits acknowledge traditional themes of portraiture as a precious form of documentation whilst offering a self-taught, unaffected naivety.

With a background in fashion and textiles, she is critically engaged with the use of colour and proportion and this knowledge has heavily informed the stylistic and decorative qualities within her work, as well as the idea of purpose for those figures and landscapes. Colour is a significant language to her and an evocative colour palette is essential to engage with the surface, as well as a device used to signal her re-imagining of bodies within what is both a beautiful and droll environment.

Her own nostalgia and personal attachment cannot be overlooked, alongside the idea of critically exploring a terrain she has returned to as a young woman, especially that of her family’s class and identity. These narratives all unfold within the paintings along with references to regurgitated childhood memories, placed through subtle surreal motifs and unconventional decorative elements.

www.evieoconnor.com

Echo Chamber

PV: Thursday 6th July, 7-9pm
Exhibition continues: 8th – 22nd July
Open Saturdays 12-4pm

Open Studios: Saturday 8th July 12-4pm

Echo chamber reflects on the studio as a space in which thoughts, ideas and beliefs reverberate and are amplified by the repetition of rituals and processes artists define for themselves and the ongoing relationship they have with their materials and the spaces they work in.

Studios can be a place where perceptions, incentives and other instruments of self censorship operate to become an echo chamber out of which only part of an artists practice are exhibited.

Each Bankley studio holder has chosen an object from their studio that holds special significance for them…a personal token, side products of the studio practice that never get shown, objects of inspiration, a certain tool. Giving us new insight and a different perspective into the studio practice of these artists, the exhibition also features new documentation and discourse from the artists examining the role of the studio and their practice.

Strange Little Things

Private View 26th May 2017 6-9pm
Exhibition continues until 4th June 2017
Open Sat & Sun 12- 5pm

Organised and curated by Bankley member Axel Bottenberg

Darren Adcock, Iain Andrews, Clyve Bonelle, Axel Bottenberg, Jemima Brown, Paul Dodgson, Jane Fairhurst, David Hancock, Pascal Nichols, Faye Scott-Farrington, Claire Tindale, Teresa Wilson


The human figure has fascinated artists since the beginning of mankind. A lump of clay, fashioned into a human shape, a simple carving from wood or stone. The human figure is without doubt the most recognised form of sculpture in the world.

Axel Bottenberg has chosen a number of artists who have been making small scale human / humanoid figures to contribute to this show. Each artist has their own approach to using the human figure, but an overriding element is their use of a quirky nature or strange narrative.

Some artists are already fairly established, and Axel knew their work from within the Manchester art scene, others are less known and were recommended to him by friends; some he stumbled across in art events, some are long term friends whose work he respects and values.

UoM Photography Society Exhibition

It is with great pleasure that the University of Manchester Photography Society runs its first ever end of year photography exhibition.

PV Friday 12th May, 7- 9pm
(along with live musical accompaniment)

The exhibition continues 13th & 14th May 12 - 4pm.

Exhibiting artists:

Natty Arendt; Junaid Ali Bokhari; Yu-Kai Chen; Antonia Cheng; Manasij Pal Chowdhury; Robert Coates; James Giblin; Alfie Greenwood; Laura Gritti; Sabrina Jones; Yaffa Judah; Aishah Khan; Shan Li; Alicia Love; Johnny McMullan; Prakrithi Narayanan; Molly Page; Shamena Qureshi; Asha Ray; Zara Riches; Sharmistha Saha; Ainin Sofiya; Roald Teffries; Matt Wharton; Timothy Wu; Jingyi Yang; Ethan Yap; Arthur Yushi.

(All artists are currently studying a variety of subjects at UoM)

www.facebook.com/events/433311417001794/?active_tab=about

Spatial Affinities

// CREATIVITY

22nd -30th April 2017
Preview 21st April 6-9pm

Stacey Coughlin
in conversation with Elaine Fox, Lisa Risbec and Jodie Silverman

‘Spatial Affinities’ is an exploration of the essence of Space/Place and our emotional and behavioural responses to it, within both the individual and collective context.

Containing installation sculptures, the exhibition considers the idea that conversations form their own atmosphere or ambience and how mental imagery can emerge and linger through these interactions.

Influenced by relational aesthetics, hermeneutics, and dialogical art, this series involves talking one-to-one with creative practitioners and artists about their creativity. These intangible experiences are then made physical in the form of a sensory environment; partially revealing elements of the discussion within spatial representations.

The individual spaces converse between themselves creating a collective voice of shared meanings and opposing ideas. The conversation dialogue is not shared with the audience; causing layers of meaning and context to be both created and lost through the representational process.


Spatial Shared Discussion: 30 April 2-4pm
All welcome to attend
Drawing the exhibition to a close, some of the artists involved will be in discussion together and responding to the artworks on display

Eventbrite link:
www.spatial-affinities-shared-space.eventbrite.co.uk


Open Sat & Sun 12-4pm
or by appointment. Please contact staceycoughlin.art@gmail.com


http://www.elainefoxartist.co.uk
http://www.lisarisbec.co.uk
http://www.jodiesilverman.com
http://architecturalechoes.com

PLAY

Opening night: Friday 24th March 2017, 7-9pm
Open Saturdays, 25th March - 8th April 2017, 12-4pm

PLAY invited artists working in all disciplines across the UK to question its very role in everyday contemporary arts practice. The exhibition presents works that either challenge the notion of Play itself or where the idea of Play seems to be a preoccupation from the selected artists.

Emily Binks
Mat Birchall
Sarah Blaszczok
Axel Bottenberg
Stacey Coughlin
Paul Dodgson
Rowan Eastwood
Hannah Farrell
Sarah Louise Hawkins
Martha Haywood
Richard Hughes
Precious Innes
Phil Kennedy
Chen Yun Ling
Will Marshall
Peter Seal
Mike Slater
Claire Tindale
Daniel Turner

Wide Margins

Precious Innes | Isabel Moseley | Jessica Thornton are northern artists based across Manchester and Yorkshire, working with print, sculpture and new media. Wide Margins explores the notion of place, how it is occupied and the dialogue created within three cross-disciplinary practices.

Exhibition Private View: Friday 24th Feb 2017, 7-9pm
Exhibition continues: 25th – 26th Feb 2017, 12-4pm
Open by appointment: 27th Feb – 1st Mar 2017

www.preciousinnes.com/
www.isabelmoseley.co.uk/
www.jessicathornton.co.uk/

Fragments

A photography exhibition, print fair and fundraiser held by third year practitioners at Manchester School of Art.

Preview Night Friday 16th December 7-9pm
Plus refreshments and print fair!

Exhibition continues: Saturday 17th and Sunday 18th, 12-5pm
Prints available to buy all weekend!

Untitled (2:10am)

‘Untitled (2:10am)’ is a photo-series by Bankley member Andy Broadey that draws together cinematic, architectural and musical references to examine the relationship between time and change within the post-communist condition.

The work is part of an ongoing examination of the relationship between imagery, time and political agency. The work’s title refers to Sergei Eisenstein’s 1927 film ‘October’, the closing scenes of which mark the moment of the Bolshevik victory (2:10am) with a montage of clocks from across the globe. Time is foregrounded here as the medium of revolutionary action. In thesis seventeen of his 'Thesis on the Philosophy of History', Walter Benjamin draws also upon the iconography of clocks and links it with revolutionary action, referring to an eye-witness report of insurgents shooting clock towers during the French revolution of 1830; Benjamin claims that revolutionary emancipation invokes the closure of a mode of temporality. To this end, ‘Untitled (2:10am)’ utilises universally recognisable imagery of alarm clocks to disrupt the seemingly ossified relations between chronometric time, labour-time and money, the conjunction of which Sami Khatib has recently described as ‘capital-time’ (Khatib, 2009-11).

Exhibition Opening: Friday 25th November 2016, 6-9pm

Exhibition continues: 26th/27th November, 3rd/4th and 10th December. 12-4pm

www.facebook.com/events/222606364831008/?notif_t=plan_user_associated¬if_id=1479678112503705

Garten der Kunstformen

Kasumi Dean, Leo Robinson, Carina Ripley
Curated by Tom Emery

Exhibition PV 4th of Nov 2016 7-9pm
Exhibition continues until the 19th Nov 2016
Open Saturdays 12-4pm

Following their two month residency undertaken in Bankley’s Studio 20; Kasumi Dean, Leo Robinson and Carina Ripley present Garten der Kunstformen. This exhibition is the culmination of the process begun when these three artists were selected for Bankley’s graduate residency, bringing together three apparently disparate practices and with the provision of time and shared space, allowing them to overlap, for ideas and interests to be shared and for common ground to be discovered. This common ground has taken shape with the concept of the garden, whether as a space that exists in conflict with the built environment, as a site for ritual and myth, or as representative of the regenerative cycle of life and death.

Dean considers the meeting of the mass produced and the kitsch in contrast with the natural and organic. In one tongue-in-cheek moment, the packaging from fruit flavoured sweets – perhaps the ultimate kitsch, artificial commodification of nature – become the medium for a patterned surface, the repetition and application allowing for them to become considered aesthetic material rather than simply a cheap play for attention.

Robinson retells the Roman myth of Pomona, as it applies to Manchester’s own Pomona Island. In myth, Pomona is a goddess of fruitful abundance, importantly the natural flourishing of fruit trees, rather than their harvest. Robinson finds a neatly ironic parallel in the tale of Pomona and her present-day namesake; the goddess Pomona was tricked by Vertumnus so that he could gain access to her orchard, while in Manchester, property developers spin their own tales in order to exploit Pomona Island’s resources.

Ripley tells stories of femininity and the female body. With Rise, Ripley uses weaving, traditionally perceived as a female activity, Ripley plays with imagery of the ‘red tent’, a place for menstruating women to congregate and consider their own place within the natural environment. Ripley also makes bold, direct statements on how the female body is perceived and commodified, with her film Wash house, using clothes pegs to uncomfortably highlight parts of the female body, taking an almost medical attitude towards doing so.